ON THE CATWALK FOR A CAUSE: Polished Fashion Show

Polished Fashion Show Models with Founder Kat Armstrong (centered in red)

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Last week, I had the pleasure and honor to walk in the annual Polished Fashion Show at Belk. When founder Kat Armstrong asked me to be part of it I couldn’t say YESSSS fast enough. I admire her tremendously and what she’s created to give faith-filled entrepreneurial women a place to connect and grow. When I first moved back to Dallas, I went through a period of sadness because I didn’t think the women here “spoke my language”. By the grace of God, over time I found a beautiful tribe of like-minded women who also believe in being spirit-led in every aspect of life.

So often spirit-led, mission-driven women feel they should separate their business and their faith. 

After all, faith is for early-risers on Sunday mornings, and the rest of the week is meant for work and fun, right? We couldn’t disagree more. Back in 2008, we took a closer look at the up-and-coming young professional workforce. We saw that not only are they leaving empty spots in the pew, but they’re leaving their faith at home when they head to work.  The young professional women of this generation are smarter and more forward-thinking than any generation before. But life is still hard, and we all face challenges that we can’t overcome alone. That’s why we launched Polished – to give women a place to find a community of women just like them. And while we’re there, we talk about how faith isn’t just for a dusty corner of an old bookshelf; it’s relevant to situations we face every day in real life. via Polishedonline.org 

Fashion Show Emcees, Catherine Lowe of Lowe Co + Whitney Kutch of Hello Whitney

To get connected, I highly recommend attending their monthly luncheons. The first Wednesday of the month, Polished Dallas hosts a luncheon with an inspiring speaker. For dates, location and registration details check HERE.

Also, make sure to attend next years fashion show. It was a blast and so refreshing to be part of an event where the women are truly bright lights fanning each others flames. You could feel God right there in the midst of Belk. Many events can feel stuffy and give you social anxiety, but you could sense a sigh of relief and level of comfort among the women. Hope to see you there!

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Are You Proud To Be A Woman? I AM.

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Hey Sistas,

I honor each of you today. Many thoughts have come to me regarding International Women’s Day. I thought I would share what’s been running through my head all day:

  • My heart is filled with gratitude to my mother for instilling the “you can do anything you dream of” mentality in my sister and I.
  • Deep admiration & respect toward my mom for always working hard in her job and even harder at home to create a safe home for us as kids. She never hired a housekeeper and we rarely had a babysitter. She’s 66 and still happily working.
  • Deep admiration for my Japanese immigrant grandmother for choosing to leave her family and career as a clothing designer to raise her family in America.
  • Pride and respect for my multi-talented younger sister who has followed her dreams and remained true to herself while finding her calling. It takes guts to try new things and change careers. She’s one of the gutsiest gals I know! If you’re in LA, she’s setting up her skincare/esthetician practice at several locations including the Beauty Boutique.
  • As a young woman living in the US, I’ve been able to work as an entrepreneur (I began modeling at 14 and started my 1st business at 16 doing graphic art, logos and designing T-shirts for companies), pave my own way and ask for the pay I’m worth all while trying to make a difference.  This overwhelms me! Again, I thank my parents for teaching us to fly and supporting all our crazy, but creative ideas. 
  • I’m more passionate than ever to help instill belief, vision, confidence and positivity in our young women to prepare them for a successful future.
  • This blog is proof that we are blessed as women in the US with the ability to share our voice, ideas and thoughts.  Women in many countries are still forced to remain silent.
  • I echo the sentiment in an Instagram photo I recently shared from Marie Forleo (one of my favorite biz mentors) which said, “Ambition is beautiful”. Her caption read, “You were born to create and contribute. Don’t let the noise of the world drown out the work your soul came here to do”. That goes for the boss lady doing the hustle and the stay-at-home mom raising future leaders. You do your thing and do it well!

WHAT DOES THIS DAY MEAN TO YOU?

In case you aren’t aware of what IWD is all about, here is a description from the website:

International Women’s Day has been observed since in the early 1900’s, a time of great expansion and turbulence in the industrialized world that saw booming population growth and the rise of radical ideologies.

1908
Great unrest and critical debate was occurring amongst women. Women’s oppression and inequality was spurring women to become more vocal and active in campaigning for change. Then in 1908, 15,000 women marched through New York City demanding shorter hours, better pay and voting rights.

1909
In accordance with a declaration by the Socialist Party of America, the first National Woman’s Day (NWD) was observed across the United States on 28 February. Women continued to celebrate NWD on the last Sunday of February until 1913.

1910
n 1910 a second International Conference of Working Women was held in Copenhagen. A woman named a Clara Zetkin (Leader of the ‘Women’s Office’ for the Social Democratic Party in Germany) tabled the idea of an International Women’s Day. She proposed that every year in every country there should be a celebration on the same day – a Women’s Day – to press for their demands. The conference of over 100 women from 17 countries, representing unions, socialist parties, working women’s clubs, and including the first three women elected to the Finnish parliament, greeted Zetkin’s suggestion with unanimous approval and thus International Women’s Day was the result.

1911
Following the decision agreed at Copenhagen in 1911, International Women’s Day (IWD) was honoured the first time in Austria, Denmark, Germany and Switzerland on 19 March. More than one million women and men attended IWD rallies campaigning for women’s rights to work, vote, be trained, to hold public office and end discrimination. However less than a week later on 25 March, the tragic ‘Triangle Fire’ in New York City took the lives of more than 140 working women, most of them Italian and Jewish immigrants. This disastrous event drew significant attention to working conditions and labour legislation in the United States that became a focus of subsequent International Women’s Day events. 1911 also saw women’s ‘Bread and Roses‘ campaign.
 

1913-1914
On the eve of World War I campaigning for peace, Russian women observed their first International Women’s Day on the last Sunday in February 1913. In 1913 following discussions, International Women’s Day was transferred to 8 March and this day has remained the global date for International Women’s Day ever since. In 1914 further women across Europe held rallies to campaign against the war and to express women’s solidarity.

1917
On the last Sunday of February, Russian women began a strike for “bread and peace” in response to the death over 2 million Russian soldiers in war. Opposed by political leaders the women continued to strike until four days later the Czar was forced to abdicate and the provisional Government granted women the right to vote. The date the women’s strike commenced was Sunday 23 February on the Julian calendar then in use in Russia. This day on the Gregorian calendar in use elsewhere was 8 March.

1918 – 1999
Since its birth in the socialist movement, International Women’s Day has grown to become a global day of recognition and celebration across developed and developing countries alike. For decades, IWD has grown from strength to strength annually. For many years the United Nations has held an annual IWD conference to coordinate international efforts for women’s rights and participation in social, political and economic processes. 1975 was designated as ‘International Women’s Year’ by the United Nations. Women’s organisations and governments around the world have also observed IWD annually on 8 March by holding large-scale events that honour women’s advancement and while diligently reminding of the continued vigilance and action required to ensure that women’s equality is gained and maintained in all aspects of life.

2000 and beyond
IWD is now an official holiday in Afghanistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, China (for women only), Cuba, Georgia, Guinea-Bissau, Eritrea, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Madagascar (for women only), Moldova, Mongolia, Montenegro, Nepal (for women only), Russia, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uganda, Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Vietnam and Zambia. The tradition sees men honouring their mothers, wives, girlfriends, colleagues, etc with flowers and small gifts. In some countries IWD has the equivalent status of Mother’s Day where children give small presents to their mothers and grandmothers.

The new millennium has witnessed a significant change and attitudinal shift in both women’s and society’s thoughts about women’s equality and emancipation. Many from a younger generation feel that ‘all the battles have been won for women’ while many feminists from the 1970’s know only too well the longevity and ingrained complexity of patriarchy. With more women in the boardroom, greater equality in legislative rights, and an increased critical mass of women’s visibility as impressive role models in every aspect of life, one could think that women have gained true equality. The unfortunate fact is that women are still not paid equally to that of their male counterparts, women still are not present in equal numbers in business or politics, and globally women’s education, health and the violence against them is worse than that of men.

However, great improvements have been made. We do have female astronauts and prime ministers, school girls are welcomed into university, women can work and have a family, women have real choices. And so the tone and nature of IWD has, for the past few years, moved from being a reminder about the negatives to a celebration of the positives.

Annually on March 8th, thousands of events are held throughout the world to inspire women and celebrate achievements. A global web of rich and diverse local activity connects women from all around the world ranging from political rallies, business conferences, government activities and networking events through to local women’s craft markets, theatric performances, fashion parades and more.

Many global corporations have also started to more actively support IWD by running their own internal events and through supporting external ones. For example, on 8 March search engine and media giant Google some years even changes its logo on its global search pages. Year on year IWD is certainly increasing in status. The United States even designates the whole month of March as ‘Women’s History Month’.

So make a difference, think globally and act locally!  Make everyday International Women’s Day. Do your part to ensure that the future for girls is bright, equal, safe and rewarding.

Thank you for being part of this sisterhood. Women are powerful, especially in numbers!

With love & gratitude,

Tiff

BE FAB FRIDAY: Old Hollywood Glamour at Era Salon

ERA_SalonPhoto by Josh Welch

 

HEY MY DALLAS SISTAS!

The hair salon- for most women- is hallowed ground. A place of beautification, confidence building and therapy. A woman’s crowning glory is at the top of our beauty regimen list so shouldn’t this hallowed space scream of glamour? Heck yes and I’m thrilled to tell you that my girlfriend’s new salon, ERA is the epitome of glamour, luxury and beauty. The minute you walk in to ERA, your stress melts off. The red carpet is rolled out and you are treated like a celebrity. Despite the uber-chic vibe, ERA has a welcoming Southern charm. Much like Truvy’s beauty parlor on Steel Magnolias, Maleiah has created a comfortable place to kick your heels up, have a cup of coffee or glass of champagne and share a laugh with the personable stylists. You will not only leave with bouncin’ and behavin’ hair, you will leave with a happy heart. 

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Maleiah Rogers, a veteran of the hair industry, discovered a passion for her craft at an early age while working in her mother’s salon in East Texas. After graduating from Toni and Guy in 2002, Maleiah honed her skills at the internationally acclaimed Jose Eber salon. Maleiah is a respected stakeholder in the industry and is known for her trendsetting style. Maleiah founded ERA to share her passion and inspire women to feel beautiful inside and out. ERA salon is the manifestation of Maleiah’s fashion beliefs- blending old Hollywood glamour with modern day chic. via www.erasalon.com

Maleiah_blow outMalieah doing her magic & looking fab.
Doesn’t everyone rock a fascinator to work?  

 

Era_oribeERA features and sells top of the line  products like Oribe.

 

What woman doesn’t want happy hair and a happy heart?  Call ERA today and make your appointment 214-520-6767.

4023 Oak Lawn Ave, Suite 120, Dallas TX 75219

Tell them Tiff sent ya. You will thank me later!

Be happy & be fab,

Tiff